Penetration Testing Services, by Shorebreak Security

Web Application Penetration Testing – A Simple Explanation

You can’t have a conversation about business today without talking about technology. From the best way to keep your company connected to the latest in cloud-based software, technology has become a cornerstone of our economy. But all is not gold and glitter when it comes to technology. As companies rely more heavily on their networks, they face greater security concerns—and those concerns are only growing. In fact, there’s a good chance that your company has been the victim of a cyberattack before.

Fortunately, there are a number of ways you can protect yourself from cyber-attacks. One of the most effective ways to do this is through web application penetration testing. This article will explain what web application penetration testing is and how it can help your company avoid costly breaches in the future.

Introduction to Web Application Penetration Testing

Web Application Penetration Testing is a process that involves testing web applications to find vulnerabilities and fix them before they are exploited. It is usually carried out by an ethical hacker who has knowledge of programming languages like HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, and others.

Web Application Penetration Testing can help you identify potential security problems in your website’s design or implementation that could leave your site vulnerable to attack. These problems could include:

  1. A Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability where an attacker injects malicious code into a legitimate website’s web pages, which is then executed by unsuspecting users who visit the site.
  2. A SQL Injection vulnerability where an attacker inserts malicious SQL code into a legitimate website’s database queries, which then executes on the database server itself.
  3. A Directory Traversal vulnerability where an attacker attempts to access files and directories outside of the document root directory.
  4. A Path Traversal vulnerability where an attacker attempts to access files and directories outside of a web server’s document root directory.
  5. A Local File Inclusion vulnerability where an attacker attempts to read and write files on a local system that they do not have permission to access.
  6. A Remote Code Execution vulnerability where an attacker gains access to the server and executes code as if they were logged in.
  7. A Remote File Inclusion vulnerability where an attacker attempts to include files from external sources onto the legitimate website’s web pages – An XSS Reflection vulnerability where an attacker injects malicious code into a legitimate website’s cookies and other HTTP headers, which is then executed by unsuspecting users who visit.
  8. An Open Redirection vulnerability where an attacker can redirect unsuspecting users to another malicious website by inserting malicious code into the legitimate site’s URL parameters.

Phases of Web Application Penetration Testing

As the name suggests, web application penetration testing is a type of penetration testing that focuses on the vulnerabilities present in web applications. The process involves the following phases:

– Information Gathering

In this phase, the testers gather as much information about the target website as possible. This includes things like the site’s architecture, where its files are hosted, what kind of technologies are used for hosting, and so on.

– Research and Exploitation

After the testers have gathered as much information about the target website as possible, they analyze it and try to find vulnerabilities in it. This process can take anywhere from a few hours to several days, depending on how complex the website is and how many resources are available for testing.

– Vulnerability Analysis

Once the testers have found vulnerabilities in the target website, they start analyzing them and find out what kind of impact each vulnerability has on its overall security. Each vulnerability is given a score based on different criteria like how easy it is to exploit, what kind of damage it can do if exploited by an attacker, and so on.

– Exploitation

Once the testers have found vulnerabilities and analyzed them, they try to exploit them. This can be done by manually trying to exploit the target website or by using automated tools called web app scanners that do this automatically.

– Post-Exploitation

Post-Exploitation is a process where the security professional gain access to the target website and then try to move around inside it in order to gather information about its users, their credentials, etc.

– Reporting and Recommendations

Once the tester has finished their work, they report back to the client. The report includes a list of vulnerabilities found on the website, along with details about how they could be exploited. It also includes recommendations for fixing these vulnerabilities so that they don’t pose any threat to site visitors.

– Remediation With Ongoing Support

The last step is remediating the vulnerabilities. This means that the hackers fix the issues and make sure that they don’t pose any threat to site visitors in the future. They also provide ongoing support for this purpose so that their client does not have to worry about these vulnerabilities.

The 3 Different Approaches to Penetration Testing

There are three main types of web application penetration testing: white box, black box, and grey box.

1) White Box Testing

White box testing involves performing a standard penetration test on a web application but with the knowledge that you have complete access to the source code. This means you know exactly how everything works, so you can target specific areas in order to find vulnerabilities more easily. White box testing is typically done by developers or other people who already have access to the source code before it’s released publicly—or at least someone who has access to it in order to perform this kind of test.

2) Black Box Testing

Black box testing (also known as “fuzzing”) involves running automated vulnerability scanners against an application without any prior knowledge about its inner workings or workings at all (except maybe some high-level descriptions from your client). You don’t know where there might be holes in the software or what kind of weaknesses it might have, but you’re going to try to find them anyway. Black box testing is typically done by developers or other people who already have access to the source code before it’s released publicly—or at least someone who has access to it in order to perform this kind of test.

The idea behind black box testing is that it’s a way to simulate what an attacker would do if they were trying to find vulnerabilities in your software. This may sound like the kind of thing that you shouldn’t be doing if you aren’t an expert (and even then), but it can be really helpful for finding holes in your code that might otherwise go unnoticed. The reason is simple: If you’re testing from within the confines of a black box, you’re not aware of what the code does and how it works. This means that you’re much more likely to notice flaws that others might have missed simply because they don’t know what to look for.

3) Grey Box

Grey box testing is a type of penetration testing that involves simulating an attacker who’s aware of your software’s functionality but doesn’t know anything about its inner workings. This means that they’ll be able to use what information they have about your application in order to find vulnerabilities, which helps make sure that you’re not missing anything important when it comes to security.

Final Conclusion

While all of these types of testing are important, it’s important to note that no single type will be able to completely cover every angle. That’s why you should always do multiple types of penetration testing, and other types of security testing on your application so that you can make sure that there are no holes or other vulnerabilities left unaddressed. For best results, you should also be sure to hire a security testing company that can do all of these types of penetration testing and other types of security testing for you. This way, you won’t have to worry about whether or not your application is secure—they’ll make sure that it is!